Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP)

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentrate of platelet-rich plasma protein derived from whole blood, centrifuged to removed red blood cells. It has a greater concentration of growth factors than whole blood, and has been used to encourage a brisk healing response across several specialties, in particular dentistry, orthopedics and dermatology.


As a concentrated source of blood plasma and autologous conditioned plasma, PRP contains several different growth factors and other cytokines that can stimulate healing of soft tissue and joints. Main indication in sports medicine and orthopedics are acute muscle strains, tendinopathy and muscle-fascial injuries and osteoarthritis. Main indications in dermatology for PRP are androgenic alopecia, wound healing, and skin rejuvenation. For preparation of PRP, various protocols are used, with an underlying principle of concentrating platelets to 3–5 times physiological levels, then injecting this concentrate in the tissue where healing is desired.

What Is Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP)?

Although blood is mainly a liquid (called plasma), it also contains small solid components (red cells, white cells, and platelets.) The platelets are best known for their importance in clotting blood. However, platelets also contain hundreds of proteins called growth factors which are very important in the healing of injuries.

PRP is plasma with many more platelets than what is typically found in blood. The concentration of platelets — and, thereby, the concentration of growth factors — can be 5 to 10 times greater (or richer) than usual.

To develop a PRP preparation, blood must first be drawn from a patient. The platelets are separated from other blood cells and their concentration is increased during a process called centrifugation. Then the increased concentration of platelets is combined with the remaining blood.

 

PRP Advantanges

  • Helps Treat Unresponsive Chronic Pain & Injuries
  • Reduces Tendonitis Symptoms
  • Helps Decrease Osteoarthritis Symptoms
  • Helps Heal Conditions like Plantar Fasciitis & Jumper/Runner’s Knee
  • Reduces Lower Back Pain
  • Natural Hair Loss Treatment
 

How PRP & Stem Cell Treatments Work

According to Dr. Brian Browning, of the Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine Residency Program at Florida Hospital East Orlando, “The basic mechanism of Prolotherapy and PRP is simple”

  • PRP substance is injected into the affected tissue (joints, ligaments or tendons, for example), which leads to local inflammation and a “wound healing cascade” resulting in: deposition of new collagen, plus healing initiated and controlled by bioactive proteins found in platelets, plasma and white blood cells.
  • Some PRP treatments also inject high concentrations of stem cells into the affected area (more on this below).
  • New collagen shrinks as it matures, and this tightens the damaged ligament or tendon, making it stronger (similarly to how collagen helps tighten aging, sagging skin).
  • PRP substance is very different than an ordinary blood sample because it contains much higher concentrations of platelets and cell ratios (for example “normal blood” has about 6 percent platelets while PRP has about 94 percent). Platelets contain a number of proteins, cytokines and other bioactive factors that initiate and regulate basic aspects of natural wound healing, including those of the skin, connective tissue, etc.
  • Research shows that growth factors in PRP help stimulate cell replication, proliferation of myoblasts, vascular endothelial growth, and insulin-like growth factor-1 that carry out repair of skeletal and muscular structures. The main growth factors found in PRP include: platelet-derived, angiongensis, fibroblast, hepatocyte, insulin-like, epidermal and transforming factors. Three plasma proteins (fib

About PRP

Research shows that growth factors in PRP help stimulate cell replication, proliferation of myoblasts, vascular endothelial growth, and insulin-like growth factor-1 that carry out repair of skeletal and muscular structures. The main growth factors found in PRP include: platelet-derived, angiongensis, fibroblast, hepatocyte, insulin-like, epidermal and transforming factors. Three plasma proteins (fibrin, fibronectin and vitronectin) also contribute to the body’s repair matrix.

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